Some Context

Oak Hills opened their high school campus to student devices in the fall of 2010. I was a central part of the team that developed a framework for implementing BYOD.

The purpose of this series of links is to share what I’ve learned as well as provide a framework for other districts to use (or borrow parts of) for their own implementation of a BYOD program.

Please note: These links bring you to a website outside of my portfolio.

A Framework for BYOD

The following framework is what we used at Oak Hills. We realize that every district is unique in its own ways with its own cultures and concerns. Many districts are starting BYOD programs with slightly different approaches. We encourage districts to borrow, customize, and develop as they see fit (and maybe add to the comment section below so that we can know what works for you!).

Steps

  1. Step 1: Community Engagement
  2. Step 2: Develop a Team
  3. Step 3: Developing the Physical Infrastructure
  4. Step 4: Developing the Tools (Software Infrastructure) (KEY!)
  5. Step 5: Developing a Portal
  6. Step 6: Developing an Acceptable Use Policy
  7. Step 7: Building your Curriculum
  8. Step 8: Considering Devices
  9. Step 9: Monitoring Usage
  10. Q & A

Why Bring Your Own Device?

ipadPersonalization

We find that many (yet certainly not all) of students have their own devices – be that a smartphone, their own laptop, tablet or iPod Touch. They’re already using these devices, so it makes sense for us to leverage this usage in an educational setting.

Costs

It goes without saying the a BYOD policy allows a district to get closer to a 1 to 1 device ratio without incurring the costs of a 1 to 1 program. This isn’t to say BYOD is cost free. Funds are required to invest in a solid wireless infrastructure as well as investing in devices for students who may not be able to provide their own devices. Still, there are definite cost savings in a BYOD program.

Image Credit
Ipad Interactive Design by VFS Digital Design CC by 2.0
Device Pile by Jeremy Keith

September 18, 2010

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